Planned and build at the end of last century, Sykhiv district is the biggest housing in Lviv. It was the same-named village, where Soviet modernism style panel constructing was taking place.

Back in 80’s, they believed it’s possible to raise up a happy generation of Soviet Lviv habitats. They’ve built schools, cafes, fountains and cinema. Then, Chornobyl had happened and young city citizens met new neighbours, who were displaced from the Zone. They’ve even built a separate house for them. People called it a ‘Berlin Wall’, because of its length and height. Meanwhile, 90’s begun. Spontaneous markets popped up everywhere and the village came back to Sykhiv with its vegetables, fruit and mushrooms from the closest farms and woods.

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After March of 2014, a lot of Crimean people moved to Sykhiv, became another element at this complex urbanistic formula.

We are used to some standard image of Lviv as a city with a stunning architecture at its centre, full of history. It’s not easy to find a space for something new there – it’s full of touristy equipped facades. Here in Sykhiv you can feel the heart of this city – it’s young and strong. Covered with playgrounds, second-hand stores and churches. Highway and tram rails are here to connect, balance and replace. The city is flowing and going South-Eastern direction.

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Text and photo by Sasha Naselenko

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